Louis Armstrong

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Louis Armstrong in 1953
Born Louis Daniel Armstrong
August 4, 1901
New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.
Died July 6, 1971 (aged 69)
Corona, Queens, New York City, New York, U.S.
Cause of death Heart attack
Other names “Satchmo”
“Dipper”
“Dippermouth”
“Pops”
“Satch”
Occupation
Musician composer singer actor
Spouses Daisy Parker (m. 1918; div. 1923)
Lil Hardin Armstrong (m. 1924; div. 1938)
Alpha Smith (m. 1938; div. 1942)
Lucille Wilson (m. 1942)
Musical career
Genres
Dixieland jazz swing traditional pop
Instruments
Trumpet cornet vocals
Associated acts
Joe “King” Oliver Ella Fitzgerald Kid Ory Jack Teagarden
Louis Armstrong (August 4, 1901 – July 6, 1971), nicknamed Satchmo or Pops, was an American trumpeter, composer, singer and occasional actor who was one of the most influential figures in jazz. His career spanned five decades, from the 1920s to the 1960s, and different eras in jazz.

Coming to prominence in the 1920s as an “inventive” trumpet and cornet player, Armstrong was a foundational influence in jazz, shifting the focus of the music from collective improvisation to solo performance. With his instantly recognizable gravelly voice, Armstrong was also an influential singer, demonstrating great dexterity as an improviser, bending the lyrics and melody of a song for expressive purposes. He was also skilled at scat singing.

Renowned for his charismatic stage presence and voice almost as much as for his trumpet-playing, Armstrong’s influence extends well beyond jazz music, and by the end of his career in the 1960s, he was widely regarded as a profound influence on popular music in general. Armstrong was one of the first truly popular African-American entertainers to “cross over”, whose skin color was secondary to his music in an America that was extremely racially divided. He rarely publicly politicized his race, often to the dismay of fellow African-Americans, but took a well-publicized stand for desegregation in the Little Rock Crisis. His artistry and personality allowed him socially acceptable access to the upper echelons of American society which were highly restricted for black men of his era.

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