Archive for the ‘1945’ Category

Dick Van Dyke

img_0019

Born Richard Wayne Van Dyke

December 13, 1925 (age 91)
West Plains, Missouri, U.S.
Residence Malibu, California, U.S.
Occupation
Actor comedian producer writer singer dancer
Years active 1947–present
Home town Danville, Illinois, U.S.
Spouses
Margie Willett
(m. 1948; div. 1984)
Arlene Silver
(m. 2012)
Partner Michelle Triola (1976–2009)
Children 4, including Barry Van Dyke
Relatives
Jerry Van Dyke (brother)
Shane Van Dyke (grandson)
Military career
Service/branch U.S. Army Air Forces
Years of service 1944–1945
Battles/wars World War II
Richard Wayne “Dick” Van Dyke (born December 13, 1925) is an American actor, comedian, singer, dancer, writer, and producer. The older brother of Jerry Van Dyke and father of Barry Van Dyke, his entertainment career has spanned almost seven decades. After gaining recognition on radio and Broadway, Van Dyke became known for his role as Rob Petrie on the CBS television sitcom The Dick Van Dyke Show, which ran from 1961 to 1966. He also gained significant popularity for roles in the musical films Bye Bye Birdie (1963), Mary Poppins (1964), and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (1968). His other prominent film appearances include roles in The Comic (1969), Dick Tracy (1990), Curious George (2006), Night at the Museum (2006), and Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb (2014).

Recipient of five Primetime Emmys, a Tony and a Grammy Award, Van Dyke was inducted into the Television Hall of Fame in 1995. He received the Screen Actors Guild’s highest honor, the SAG Life Achievement Award, in 2013. Van Dyke has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 7021 Hollywood Boulevard and has also been recognized as a Disney Legend.

Early life

Van Dyke was born on December 13, 1925, in West Plains, Missouri, to Hazel Victoria (née McCord; 1896–1992), a stenographer, and Loren Wayne Van Dyke (1900–1976), a salesman. He grew up in Danville, Illinois. He is the older brother of actor Jerry Van Dyke, who is best known for a role on the TV series Coach. Van Dyke has Dutch, Scottish, Irish and English ancestry, with a family line that traces back to Mayflower passenger John Alden.

Among his high school classmates in Danville were Donald O’Connor and Bobby Short, both of whom would go on to successful careers as entertainers. One of Van Dyke’s closest friends was a cousin of Gene Hackman, the future Oscar-winning actor, who also lived in Danville in those years. Van Dyke’s mother’s family was very religious, and for a brief period in his youth he considered a career in ministry, although a drama class in high school convinced him that his true calling was as a professional entertainer. In his autobiography he wrote, “I suppose that I never completely gave up my childhood idea of being a minister. Only the medium and the message changed. I have still endeavored to touch people’s souls, to raise their spirits and put smiles on their faces.”  Even after the launch of his career as an entertainer, he taught Sunday school in the Presbyterian Church, where he was an elder, and he continued to read such theologians as Buber, Tillich, and Bonhoeffer, who helped explain in practical terms the relevance of religion in everyday life.

Van Dyke left high school in 1944, his senior year, intending to join the United States Army Air Forces for pilot training during World War II. Denied enlistment several times for being underweight, he was eventually accepted for service as a radio announcer before transferring to the Special Services and entertaining troops in the continental United States. He received his high school diploma in 2004.

Radio and stage

During the late 1940s, Van Dyke was a radio DJ in Danville, Illinois. In 1947, Van Dyke was persuaded by pantomime performer Phil Erickson to form a comedy duo with him called “Eric and Van—the Merry Mutes.” The team toured the West Coast nightclub circuit, performing a mime act and lip synching to old 78 records. They brought their act to Atlanta, Georgia, in the early 1950s and performed a local television show featuring original skits and music called “The Merry Mutes”.

In November 1959, Van Dyke made his Broadway debut in The Girls Against the Boys. He then played the lead role of Albert Peterson in Bye Bye Birdie, which ran from April 14, 1960 to October 7, 1961. In a May 2011 interview with Rachael Ray, Van Dyke said that when he auditioned for a smaller part in the show he had no experience as a dancer, and that after he sang his audition song he did an impromptu soft-shoe out of sheer nervousness. Gower Champion, the show’s director and choreographer, was watching, and promptly went up on stage to inform Van Dyke he had the lead. An astonished Van Dyke protested that he could not dance, to which Champion replied “We’ll teach you”. That musical won four Tony awards including Van Dyke’s Best Featured Actor Tony, in 1961. In 1980, Van Dyke appeared as the title role in the first Broadway revival of The Music Man.

Television
Van Dyke’s start in television was with WDSU-TV New Orleans Channel 6 (NBC), first as a single comedian and later as emcee of a comedy program. Van Dyke’s first network TV appearance was with Dennis James on James’ Chance of a Lifetime in 1954. He later appeared in two episodes of The Phil Silvers Show during its 1957–58 season. He also appeared early in his career on ABC’s The Pat Boone Chevy Showroom and NBC’s The Polly Bergen Show. During this time a friend from the Army was working as an executive for CBS television and recommended Van Dyke to that network. Out of this came a seven-year contract with the network. During an interview on NPR’s Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me! program, Van Dyke said he was the anchorman for the CBS morning show during this period with Walter Cronkite as his newsman.

From 1961 to 1966, Van Dyke starred in the CBS sitcom The Dick Van Dyke Show, in which he portrayed a comedy writer named Rob Petrie. Originally the show was supposed to have Carl Reiner as the lead but CBS insisted on recasting and Reiner chose Van Dyke to replace him in the role. Complementing Van Dyke was a veteran cast of comic actors including Rose Marie, Morey Amsterdam, Jerry Paris, Ann Morgan Guilbert, Richard Deacon, and Carl Reiner (as Alan Brady), as well as 23-year-old Mary Tyler Moore, who played Rob’s wife Laura Petrie. Van Dyke won three Emmy Awards as Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series, and the series received four Emmy Awards as Outstanding Comedy Series.

From 1971 to 1974, Van Dyke starred in an unrelated sitcom called The New Dick Van Dyke Show in which he portrayed a local television talk show host. Although the series was developed by Carl Reiner and starred Hope Lange as his wife, and he received a Golden Globe nomination for his performance, the show was less successful than its predecessor, and Van Dyke pulled the plug on the show after just three seasons. In 1973, Van Dyke voiced his animated likeness for the October 27, 1973 installment of Hanna-Barbera’s The New Scooby-Doo Movies, “Scooby-Doo Meets Dick Van Dyke,” the series’ final first-run episode. The following year, he received an Emmy Award nomination for his role as an alcoholic businessman in the television movie The Morning After (1974). Van Dyke revealed after its release that he had recently overcome a real-life drinking problem. He admits he was an alcoholic for 25 years. That same year he guest-starred as a murdering photographer on an episode of Columbo, Negative Reaction. Van Dyke returned to comedy in 1976 with the sketch comedy show Van Dyke and Company, which co-starred Andy Kaufman and Super Dave Osborne. Despite being canceled after three months, the show won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Comedy-Variety Series. After a few guest appearances on the long-running comedy-variety series The Carol Burnett Show, Van Dyke became a regular on the show, in the fall of 1977. However, he only appeared in half of the episodes of the final season. For the next decade he appeared mostly in TV movies. One atypical role was as a murdering judge on the second episode of the TV series Matlock in 1986 starring Andy Griffith. In 1987, he guest-starred in an episode of Airwolf, with his son Barry Van Dyke, who was the lead star of the show’s fourth and final season on USA Network. In 1989, he guest-starred on the NBC comedy series The Golden Girls portraying a lover of Beatrice Arthur’s character. This role earned him his first Emmy Award nomination since 1977.

His film work affected his TV career: the reviews he received for his role as D.A. Fletcher in Dick Tracy led him to star as the character Dr. Mark Sloan first in an episode of Jake and the Fatman, then in a series of TV movies on CBS that became the foundation for his popular television drama Diagnosis: Murder. The series ran from 1993 to 2001 with son Barry Van Dyke co-starring in the role of Dr. Sloan’s son Lieutenant Detective Steve Sloan. Also starring on the same show was daytime soap actress Victoria Rowell as Dr. Sloan’s pathologist/medical partner, Dr. Amanda Bentley, and Charlie Schlatter in the role of Dr. Sloan’s student, Dr. Jesse Travis. Van Dyke continued to find television work after the show ended, including a dramatically and critically successful performance of The Gin Game, produced for television in 2003 that reunited him with Mary Tyler Moore. In 2003, he portrayed a doctor on Scrubs. A 2004 special of The Dick Van Dyke Show titled The Dick Van Dyke Show Revisited was heavily promoted as the first new episode of the classic series to be shown in 38 years. Van Dyke and his surviving cast members recreated their roles; the program was roundly panned by critics. In 2006 he guest-starred as college professor Dr. Jonathan Maxwell for a series of Murder 101 mystery films on the Hallmark Channel.

Film
Van Dyke began his film career by playing the role of Albert J. Peterson in the film version of Bye Bye Birdie (1963). Despite his unhappiness with the adaptation—its focus differed from the stage version in that the story now centered on a previously supporting character—the film was a success. That same year, Van Dyke was cast in two roles: as the chimney sweep Bert, and as bank chairman Mr. Dawes Senior, in Walt Disney’s Mary Poppins (1964). For his scenes as the chairman, he was heavily costumed to look much older and was credited in that role as “Nackvid Keyd” (at the end of the credits, the letters unscramble into “Dick Van Dyke”). Van Dyke’s attempt at a cockney accent has been lambasted as one of the worst accents in film history, cited by actors since as an example of how not to sound. In a 2003 poll by Empire magazine of the worst-ever accents in film, he came in second (Sean Connery in The Untouchables came in first despite Connery winning an Academy Award for that performance). According to Van Dyke, his accent coach was Irish, who “didn’t do an accent any better than I did”, and that no one alerted him how bad it was during the production. Still, Mary Poppins was successful on release and its appeal has endured. “Chim Chim Cher-ee”, one of the songs that Van Dyke performed in Mary Poppins, won the Academy Award for Best Original Song for the Sherman Brothers, the film’s songwriting duo.
Dick Van Dyke in the 1964 film Mary Poppins
Many of the comedy films Van Dyke starred in throughout the 1960s were relatively unsuccessful at the box office, including What a Way to Go! with Shirley MacLaine, Lt. Robin Crusoe, U.S.N., Fitzwilly, The Art of Love with James Garner and Elke Sommer, Some Kind of a Nut, Never a Dull Moment with Edward G. Robinson, and Divorce American Style with Debbie Reynolds and Jean Simmons. But he also starred as Caractacus Pott (with his native accent, at his own insistence, despite the English setting) in the successful musical version of Ian Fleming’s Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (1968), which co-starred Sally Ann Howes and featured the same songwriters (The Sherman Brothers) and choreographers (Marc Breaux and Dee Dee Wood) as Mary Poppins.

In 1969, Van Dyke appeared in the comedy-drama The Comic, written and directed by Carl Reiner. Van Dyke portrayed a self-destructive silent film era comedian who struggles with alcoholism, depression, and his own rampant ego. Reiner wrote the film especially for Van Dyke, who often spoke of his admiration for silent film era comedians such as Charlie Chaplin and his hero Stan Laurel. On Larry King Live, Van Dyke mentioned he turned down the lead role in The Omen which was played by Gregory Peck. He also mentioned his dream role would have been the scarecrow in The Wizard of Oz. Twenty-one years later in 1990, Van Dyke, whose usual role had been the amiable hero, took a small but villainous turn as the crooked DA Fletcher in Warren Beatty’s film Dick Tracy. Van Dyke returned to motion pictures in 2006 with Curious George as Mr. Bloomsberry and as villain Cecil Fredericks in the Ben Stiller film Night at the Museum. He reprised the role in a cameo for the sequel, Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian (2009), but it was cut from the film. It can be found in the special features on the DVD release. He also played the character again in the third film, Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb (2014).

Other projects

Van Dyke in Mary Poppins, 1964
Van Dyke received a Grammy Award in 1964, along with Julie Andrews, for his performance on the soundtrack to Mary Poppins. In 1970, he published Faith, Hope and Hilarity: A Child’s Eye View of Religion a book of humorous anecdotes based largely on his experiences as a Sunday School teacher. Van Dyke was principal in “KXIV Inc.” and owned 1400 AM KXIV in Phoenix (later KSUN) from 1965 to 1985.

As an a cappella enthusiast, he has sung in a group called “Dick Van Dyke and The Vantastix” since September 2000. The quartet has performed several times in Los Angeles as well as on Larry King Live, The First Annual TV Land Awards, and sang the national anthem at three Los Angeles Lakers games including a nationally televised NBA Finals performance on NBC. Van Dyke was made an honorary member of the Barbershop Harmony Society in 1999.

Van Dyke became a computer animation enthusiast after purchasing a Commodore Amiga in 1991. He is credited with the creation of 3D-rendered effects used on Diagnosis: Murder and The Dick Van Dyke Show Revisited. Van Dyke has displayed his computer-generated imagery work at SIGGRAPH, and continues to work with LightWave 3D.

In 2010, Van Dyke appeared on a children’s album titled Rhythm Train, with Red Hot Chili Peppers drummer Chad Smith and singer Leslie Bixler. Van Dyke raps on one of the album’s tracks.

Personal life
Van Dyke’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame
On February 12, 1948, while appearing at the Chapman Park Hotel on Wilshire Boulevard in Los Angeles, he and the former Margerie Willett were married on the radio show Bride and Groom. They had four children: Christian, Barry, Stacy, and Carrie Beth. They divorced in 1984 after a long separation.

Van Dyke lived with longtime companion Michelle Triola for more than 30 years, until her death in 2009.

He incorporated his children and grandchildren into his TV endeavors. Son Barry Van Dyke, grandsons Shane Van Dyke and Carey Van Dyke along with other Van Dyke grandchildren and relatives appeared in various episodes of the long-running series Diagnosis: Murder. Although Stacy Van Dyke was not well known in show business, she made an appearance in the Diagnosis: Murder Christmas episode “Murder in the Family” (season 4) as Carol Sloan Hilton, the estranged daughter of Dr. Mark Sloan.

All of Van Dyke’s children are married; he has seven grandchildren. His son Chris was district attorney for Marion County, Oregon, in the 1980s. In 1987, Van Dyke’s granddaughter Jessica Van Dyke died from Reye’s syndrome, which led him to do a series of commercials to raise public awareness of the danger of aspirin to children.

On February 29, 2012, at the age of 86, Van Dyke married 40-year-old make-up artist Arlene Silver. They had met six years earlier at the SAG awards.

Van Dyke was a heavy smoker for most of his adult life. In a January 2013 interview with the London Daily Telegraph, he said he had been using Nicorette gum for the past decade.

In April 2013, Van Dyke revealed that for seven years he had been experiencing symptoms of a neurological disorder, in which he felt a pounding in his head whenever he lay down; but despite his undergoing tests, no diagnosis had been made. He had to cancel scheduled appearances due to fatigue from lack of sleep because of the medical condition. In May 2013, he tweeted that it seemed his titanium dental implants may be responsible.

On August 19, 2013, it was reported that the 87-year-old Van Dyke was rescued from his Jaguar by a passerby after the car had caught fire on the US 101 freeway in Calabasas, Los Angeles County. He was not injured in the fire, although the car burned down to its frame.

Van Dyke publicly endorsed Bernie Sanders as his choice for the Democratic candidate in the 2016 US presidential election. Van Dyke, a New Deal Democrat, had not actively campaigned for a candidate since Eugene McCarthy in 1968. In July 2016 Van Dyke said of Donald Trump, “He has been a magnet to all the racists and xenophobes in the country, I haven’t been this scared since the Cuban Missile Crisis. I think the human race is hanging in a delicate balance right now, and I’m just so afraid he will put us in a war. He scares me.”

Filmography

Films

1963 Bye Bye Birdie Albert F. Peterson
1964 What a Way to Go! Edgar Hopper
Mary Poppins Bert/Mr. Dawes, Sr.
1965 The Art of Love Paul Sloane/Toulouse aka Picasso
1966 Lt. Robin Crusoe, U.S.N. Lt. Robin Crusoe
1967 Divorce American Style Richard Harmon
Fitzwilly Claude R. Fitzwilliam
1968 Never a Dull Moment Jack Albany
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang Caractacus Potts
1969 Some Kind of a Nut Fred Amidon
The Comic Billy Bright
1971 Cold Turkey Rev. Clayton Brooks
1975 Tubby the Tuba Tubby the Tuba Voice role
1979 The Runner Stumbles Father Brian Rivard
1990 Dick Tracy D.A. Fletcher
2001 Walt – The Man Behind the Myth Narrator/himself Voice role
2005 Batman: New Times Commissioner Gordon Voice role
2006 Curious George Mr. Bloomsberry Voice role
Night at the Museum Cecil Fredricks
2009 Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian Cecil Fredricks Scene deleted*
2014 Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day Himself
Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb Cecil Fredricks
2015 Merry Xmas Father Short film [57]
2018 Mary Poppins Returns Cameo [58]
*Although he is not seen in the regular release of Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian, Van Dyke’s work can be seen in the “Deleted Scenes” section of the film’s DVD, along with Bill Cobbs and Mickey Rooney.

 

Television
1955–1956 The Morning Show Host CBS
1956 CBS Cartoon Theater Host
1956–1957 To Tell the Truth Panelist 5 episodes
1957–1958 The Phil Silvers Show Pvt. Lumpkin / Pvt. “Swifty” Bilko 2 episodes
1958 The Chevy Showroom Starring Andy Williams Himself
1958–1959 Mother’s Day Host
1959 Laugh Line Host Canceled after 3 months
1961–1966 The Dick Van Dyke Show Rob Petrie + others 158 Episodes
1969 Dick Van Dyke and the Other Woman Himself Special (with Mary Tyler Moore)
1970 Dick Van Dyke Meets Bill Cosby Himself Special
1971–1974 The New Dick Van Dyke Show Dick Preston 72 episodes
1973 The New Scooby-Doo Movies Himself Voice role
1974 Julie and Dick at Covent Garden Himself With Julie Andrews
Columbo Paul Galesko Episode: “Negative Reaction”
The Morning After Charlie Lester
1976 Van Dyke and Company Himself Variety series
Lola! Cast member Series
1977 The Carol Burnett Show Cast member 11 episodes
1979 Supertrain Waldo Chase Episode: “And a Cup of Kindness Too”
1981 True Life Stories Charlie Documentary
Harry’s Battles Harry Fitzsimmons Unsold half-hour pilot
How to Eat Like a Child Himself Special
1982 The Country Girl Frank Elgin Movie
Drop-Out Father Ed McCall Movie
1983 CBS Library Father (voice) Episode: “Wrong Way Kid”
Found Money Max Sheppard Movie
1984 Duck’s 50th Birthday Himself/Host Special
1985 American Playhouse Les Dischinger Episode: “Breakfast with Les and Bess”
1986 Strong Medicine Sam Hawthorne Movie
Matlock Judge Carter Addison Episode: “The Judge”
1987 Ghost of a Chance Bill Nolan Movie
Highway to Heaven Wally Dunn Episode: “Wally”
Airwolf Malduke Episode: “Malduke”
1988 The Van Dyke Show Dick Burgess 10 episodes
1989 The Golden Girls Ken Episode: “Love Under the Big Top”
1990 Matlock Judge Carter Addison Episode: “The Kidnapper” (stock footage from episode “The Judge”)
1991 Daughters of Privilege Buddy Keys Movie
Jake and the Fatman Dr. Mark Sloan Episode: “It Never Entered My Mind” (Backdoor pilot for Diagnosis Murder)
1992 Diagnosis of Murder Dr. Mark Sloan Diagnosis Murder TV movie
The House on Sycamore Street Dr. Mark Sloan Diagnosis Murder TV movie
1993 The Town That Santa Forgot Narrator/Old Jeremy Creek Voice role
A Twist of the Knife Dr. Mark Sloan Diagnosis Murder TV movie
1993–2001 Diagnosis: Murder Dr. Mark Sloan Lead role (178 episodes); also executive producer (137 episodes)
1993 Coach Luthor Van Dam’s Cousin (uncredited) Episode: “Christmas of the Van Damned”[citation needed]
1999 Becker Fred Becker Episode: “Becker the Elder” (episode 13)
2000 Sabrina, the Teenage Witch Duke Episode: “Welcome Back, Duke”
2002 A Town Without Pity Dr. Mark Sloan Diagnosis Murder movie
Without Warning Dr. Mark Sloan Diagnosis Murder movie
2003 The Gin Game Weller Martin Movie
The Alan Brady Show Webb Voice role
Scrubs Dr. Townshend Episode: “My Brother, My Keeper”
2004 The Dick Van Dyke Show Revisited Rob Petrie Movie
2006 Murder 101 Dr. Jonathan Maxwell Movie
2007 Murder 101: If Wishes Were Horses Dr. Jonathan Maxwell Movie
Murder 101: College Can Be Murder Dr. Jonathan Maxwell Movie
2008 Murder 101: The Locked Room Mystery Dr. Jonathan Maxwell Movie
2011 Hollywood Treasure Himself Episode: “Chitty Chitty Bid Bid”
2012 The Doctors Himself
Fun with Dick and Jerry Van Dyke Himself Movie
2013 Brody Stevens: Enjoy It! Himself Episode: “Born in the Valley; Hollywood Finale”
2014 Signed, Sealed, Delivered Kenneth Brandt 2 episodes [59]
Mickey Mouse Clubhouse Captain Goof-Beard Episode: “Mickey’s Pirate Adventure” [60]
2015 The Middle Dutch Spence Episode: “Two of a Kind”
Other works Edit

Stage Edit
The Girls Against the Boys (November 2 – November 14, 1959)
Bye Bye Birdie (April 14, 1960 – October 7, 1961) (left the show when it moved to the Shubert Theatre)
The Music Man (June 5 – June 22, 1980) (Revival)
Chita Rivera: The Dancer’s Life (guest star from January 24 – January 26, 2006)
Albums Edit
Bye Bye Birdie (original cast album) (1960)
Bye Bye Birdie (soundtrack) (1963)
Mary Poppins (soundtrack) (1964)
Songs I Like By Dick Van Dyke (with Enoch Light & his Orchestra/Ray Charles Singers) (1963)
Put on a Happy Face (with Dick Van Dyke and The Vantastix) (2008)
Rhythm Train (with Leslie Bixler and Chad Smith) (2010)
Books Edit
Van Dyke, Dick (1967). Altar Egos. F. H. Revell Co. LCCN 67028866.
Van Dyke, Dick (1970). Ray Parker, ed. Faith, hope and hilarity. Phil Interlandi (drawings). Garden City, New York: Doubleday. LCCN 70126387.
Van Dyke, Dick (1975). Those Funny Kids!. Warner Books.
Van Dyke, Dick (2011). My Lucky Life In and Out of Show Business. Crown Archetype. ISBN 978-0-307-59223-1. LCCN 2010043698. (Van Dyke’s memoir)
Van Dyke, Dick (2015). Keep Moving: And Other Tips and Truths About Aging. Weinstein Books.
Awards and nominations

Year Association Category Work Result
1961 Tony Awards Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Musical Bye Bye Birdie Won
1964 Grammy Awards Grammy Award for Best Album for Children Mary Poppins Won
1964 Golden Globe Awards Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy Mary Poppins Nominated
1964 Emmy Awards Outstanding Continued Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Comedy Series The Dick Van Dyke Show Won
1965 Emmy Awards Outstanding Individual Achievements in Entertainment The Dick Van Dyke Show Won
1966 Emmy Awards Outstanding Continued Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Comedy Series The Dick Van Dyke Show Won
1971 Golden Globe Awards Golden Globe Award for Best TV Actor – Musical/Comedy The New Dick Van Dyke Show Nominated
1974 Emmy Awards Best Lead Actor in a Drama The Morning After Nominated
1977 Emmy Awards Outstanding Comedy-Variety or Music Series Van Dyke and Company Won
1976 People’s Choice Awards Favorite Male Performer in a New TV Program Van Dyke and Company Won
1984 Emmy Awards Outstanding Performer in Children’s Programming CBS Library: The Wrong Way Kid” Won
1990 Emmy Awards Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series The Golden Girls: Love Under the Big Top Nominated
1994 American Comedy Awards Lifetime Achievement Award in Comedy Won
2003 Television Critics Association Career Achievement Won
2013 Screen Actors Guild Lifetime Achievement Won
2015 Daytime Emmy Awards Outstanding Performer in an Animated Program Mickey Mouse Clubhouse: Mickey’s Pirate Adventure Nominated

B.B. King

img_5424

King at the 2009 North Sea Jazz Festival

Birth name
Riley B. King
Born
September 16, 1925
Berclair, Mississippi, U.S.
Died
May 14, 2015 (aged 89)
Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S.
Genres
* Blues rhythm and blues blues rock
Occupations
* Singer guitarist songwriter record producer
Instruments
* Guitar vocals
Years active
1948–2015
Labels
* RPM Crown Kent ABC BluesWay MCA Geffen
Associated acts
* Bobby Bland Eric Clapton
Website
bbking.com
Notable instruments
Gibson ES-355 (“Lucille”)
Riley B. King (September 16, 1925 – May 14, 2015), known professionally as B.B. King, was an American blues singer, electric guitarist, songwriter, and record producer. King introduced a sophisticated style of soloing based on fluid string bending and shimmering vibrato that influenced many later electric blues guitarists.
King was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987, and is considered one of the most influential blues musicians of all time, earning the nickname “The King of the Blues”, and one of the “Three Kings of the Blues Guitar” along with Albert King and Freddie King. King was known for performing tirelessly throughout his musical career, appearing at more than 200 concerts per year on average into his 70s. In 1956, he reportedly appeared at 342 shows.
King was born on a cotton plantation in Berclair, Mississippi, and later worked at a cotton gin in Indianola, Mississippi. He was attracted to music and the guitar in church, and began his performance career in juke joints and local radio. He later lived in Memphis, Tennessee, and Chicago, and toured the world extensively. King died at the age of 89 in Las Vegas, Nevada, on May 14, 2015, from congestive heart failure and diabetic complications.

Early life

Riley B. King was born on September 16, 1925, on a cotton plantation called Berclair, near the town of Itta Bena, Mississippi, the son of sharecroppers Albert and Nora Ella King. He considered the nearby city of Indianola, Mississippi to be his home. When Riley was four years old, his mother left his father for another man, so the boy was raised by his maternal grandmother, Elnora Farr, in Kilmichael, Mississippi.
While young, King sang in the gospel choir at Elkhorn Baptist Church in Kilmichael. King was attracted to the Pentecostal Church of God in Christ because of its music. The local minister led worship with a Sears Roebuck Silvertone guitar. The minister taught King his first three chords. It seems that at the age of 12 he purchased his first guitar for $15.00, although another source indicates he was given his first guitar by Bukka White, his mother’s first cousin (King’s grandmother and White’s mother were sisters).
In November 1941 “King Biscuit Time” first aired, broadcasting on KFFA in Helena, Arkansas. It was a radio show featuring the Mississippi Delta blues. King listened to it while on break at a plantation. A self-taught guitarist, he then wanted to become a radio musician.
In 1943, King left Kilmichael to work as a tractor driver and play guitar with the Famous St. John’s Quartet of Inverness, Mississippi, performing at area churches and on WGRM in Greenwood, Mississippi.
In 1946, King followed Bukka White to Memphis, Tennessee. White took him in for the next ten months. However, King returned to Mississippi shortly afterward, where he decided to prepare himself better for the next visit, and returned to West Memphis, Arkansas, two years later in 1948. He performed on Sonny Boy Williamson’s radio program on KWEM in West Memphis, where he began to develop an audience. King’s appearances led to steady engagements at the Sixteenth Avenue Grill in West Memphis and later to a ten-minute spot on the Memphis radio station WDIA. The radio spot became so popular that it was expanded and became the Sepia Swing Club.
Initially he worked at WDIA as a singer and disc jockey, gaining the nickname “Beale Street Blues Boy”, which was later shortened to “Blues Boy” and finally to B.B. It was there that he first met T-Bone Walker. King said, “Once I’d heard him for the first time, I knew I’d have to have [an electric guitar] myself. ‘Had’ to have one, short of stealing!”

Career

1949–2005

In 1949, King began recording songs under contract with Los Angeles-based RPM Records. Many of King’s early recordings were produced by Sam Phillips, who later founded Sun Records. Before his RPM contract, King had debuted on Bullet Records by issuing the single “Miss Martha King” (1949), which did not chart well. “My very first recordings [in 1949] were for a company out of Nashville called Bullet, the Bullet Record Transcription company,” King recalled. “I had horns that very first session. I had Phineas Newborn on piano; his father played drums, and his brother, Calvin, played guitar with me. I had Tuff Green on bass, Ben Branch on tenor sax, his brother, Thomas Branch, on trumpet, and a lady trombone player. The Newborn family were the house band at the famous Plantation Inn in West Memphis.”

King assembled his own band; the B.B. King Review, under the leadership of Millard Lee. The band initially consisted of Calvin Owens and Kenneth Sands (trumpet), Lawrence Burdin (alto saxophone), George Coleman (tenor saxophone), Floyd Newman (baritone saxophone), Millard Lee (piano), George Joyner (bass) and Earl Forest and Ted Curry (drums). Onzie Horne was a trained musician elicited as an arranger to assist King with his compositions. By his own admission, King could not play chords well and always relied on improvisation.
King’s recording contract was followed by tours across the United States, with performances in major theaters in cities such as Washington, D.C., Chicago, Los Angeles, Detroit, and St. Louis, as well as numerous gigs in small clubs and juke joints of the southern United States. During one show in Twist, Arkansas, a brawl broke out between two men and caused a fire. He evacuated along with the rest of the crowd but went back to retrieve his guitar. He said he later found out that the two men were fighting over a woman named Lucille. He named the guitar Lucille, as a reminder not to fight over women or run into any more burning buildings.
Following his first Billboard Rhythm and Blues chart number one, “3 O’Clock Blues” (February 1952),[30] B.B. King became one of the most important names in R&B music in the 1950s, amassing an impressive list of hits including “You Know I Love You”, “Woke Up This Morning”, “Please Love Me”, “When My Heart Beats like a Hammer”, “Whole Lotta Love”, “You Upset Me Baby”, “Every Day I Have the Blues”, “Sneakin’ Around”, “Ten Long Years”, “Bad Luck”, “Sweet Little Angel”, “On My Word of Honor”, and “Please Accept My Love”. This led to a significant increase in his weekly earnings, from about $85 to $2,500, with appearances at major venues such as the Howard Theater in Washington and the Apollo in New York, as well as touring the entire “Chitlin’ circuit”. 1956 became a record-breaking year, with 342 concerts booked and three recording sessions. That same year he founded his own record label, Blues Boys Kingdom, with headquarters at Beale Street in Memphis. There, among other projects, he produced artists such as Millard Lee and Levi Seabury. In 1962, King signed to ABC-Paramount Records, which was later absorbed into MCA Records, and which itself was later absorbed into Geffen Records. In November 1964, King recorded the Live at the Regal album at the Regal Theater. King later said that Regal Live “is considered by some the best recording I’ve ever had . . . that particular day in Chicago everything came together . . .”
From the late 1960s, new manager Sid Seidenberg pushed King into a different type of venue as blues-rock performers like Clapton and Paul Butterfield were popularizing an appreciation of blues music among white audiences.
King gained further visibility among rock audiences as an opening act on the Rolling Stones’ 1969 American Tour. He won a 1970 Grammy Award for the song “The Thrill Is Gone”; his version became a hit on both the pop and R&B charts. It also gained the number 183 spot in Rolling Stone magazine’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.
King was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 1980, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987, and the Official Rhythm & Blues Music Hall of Fame in 2014. In 2004, he was awarded the international Polar Music Prize, given to artists “in recognition of exceptional achievements in the creation and advancement of music.”

From the 1980s to his death in 2015, he maintained a highly visible and active career, appearing on numerous television shows and performing 300 nights a year. In 1988, King reached a new generation of fans with the single “When Love Comes to Town”, a collaborative effort between King and the Irish band U2 on their Rattle and Hum album. In December 1997, he performed in the Vatican’s fifth annual Christmas concert and presented his trademark guitar “Lucille” to Pope John Paul II. In 1998, he appeared in The Blues Brothers 2000, playing the part of the lead singer of the Louisiana Gator Boys, along with Eric Clapton, Dr. John, Koko Taylor and Bo Diddley. In 2000, he and Clapton teamed up again to record Riding With the King, which won a Grammy Award for Best Traditional Blues Album.
Discussing where he took the Blues, from “dirt floor, smoke in the air” joints to grand concert halls, King said the Blues belonged everywhere beautiful music belonged. He successfully worked both sides of the commercial divide, with sophisticated recordings and “raw, raucous” live performance.
2006–2014: farewell tour and later activities

In 2006, King went on a “farewell” world tour, although he remained active afterward during the last years of his life. The tour was partly supported by Northern Irish guitarist Gary Moore, with whom King had previously toured and recorded, including the song “Since I Met You Baby”. It started in the United Kingdom, and continued with performances in the Montreux Jazz Festival and in Zürich at the Blues at Sunset. During his show in Montreux at the Stravinski Hall he jammed with Joe Sample, Randy Crawford, David Sanborn, Gladys Knight, Leela James, Andre Beeka, Earl Thomas, Stanley Clarke, John McLaughlin, Barbara Hendricks and George Duke.

In June 2006, King was present at a memorial of his first radio broadcast at the Three Deuces Building in Greenwood, Mississippi, where an official marker of the Mississippi Blues Trail was erected. The same month, a groundbreaking was held for a new museum, dedicated to King, in Indianola, Mississippi. The B.B. King Museum and Delta Interpretive Center opened on September 13, 2008.
In late October 2006, King recorded a concert album and video entitled B.B. King: Live at his B.B. King Blues Clubs in Nashville and Memphis. The four-night production featured his regular B.B. King Blues Band and captured his show as he performed it nightly around the world. Released in 2008, it was his first live performance recording in over a decade.
In 2007, King played at Eric Clapton’s second Crossroads Guitar Festival and contributed the songs “Goin’ Home”, to Goin’ Home: A Tribute to Fats Domino (with Ivan Neville’s DumpstaPhunk) and “One Shoe Blues” to Sandra Boynton’s children’s album Blue Moo, accompanied by a pair of sock puppets in a music video for the song.
In the summer of 2008, King played at the Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival in Manchester, Tennessee, where he was given a key to the city. Also in 2008, he was inducted into the Hollywood Bowl Hall of Fame.
King performed at the Mawazine festival in Rabat, Morocco, on May 27, 2010. In June 2010, King performed at the Crossroads Guitar Festival with Robert Cray, Jimmie Vaughan, and Eric Clapton. He also contributed to Cyndi Lauper’s album Memphis Blues, which was released on June 22, 2010.

In 2011, King played at the Glastonbury Music Festival, and in the Royal Albert Hall in London, where he recorded a concert video.
Rolling Stone ranked King at No. 6 on its 2011 list of the 100 greatest guitarists of all time.
On February 21, 2012, King was among the performers of “In Performance at the White House: Red, White and Blues”, during which President Barack Obama sang part of “Sweet Home Chicago”. King recorded for the debut album of rapper and producer Big K.R.I.T., who also hails from Mississippi. On July 5, 2012, King performed a concert at the Byblos International Festival in Lebanon.
On May 26, 2013, King appeared at the New Orleans Jazz Festival.
On October 3, 2014, not feeling well enough, King had to stop his live performance at the House of Blues in Chicago, Illinois. A doctor diagnosed King with dehydration and exhaustion, and the eight remaining shows of his ongoing tour had to be cancelled. King didn’t schedule any additional shows for the remainder of the year.
When I sing, I play in my mind; the minute I stop singing orally, I start to sing by playing Lucille.

Equipment

B.B. King used simple equipment. He played guitars made by various manufacturers early in his career: he played a Fender Esquire on most of his recordings with RPM Records (USA). However, he was best known for playing variants of the Gibson ES-355. In 1980, Gibson Guitar Corporation launched the B.B. King Lucille model. In 2005, Gibson made a special run of 80 Gibson Lucilles, referred to as the “80th Birthday Lucille”, the first prototype of which was given as a birthday gift to King, and which he used thereafter.
King used a Lab Series L5 2×12″ combo amplifier and had been using this amplifier for a long time. It was made by Norlin Industries for Gibson in the 1970s and 1980s. Other popular L5 users are Allan Holdsworth and Ty Tabor of King’s X. The L5 has an onboard compressor, parametric equalization, and four inputs. King also used a Fender Twin Reverb.
He used his signature model strings “Gibson SEG-BBS B.B. King Signature Electric Guitar Strings” with gauges: 10–13–17p–32w–45w–54w and D’Andrea 351 MD SHL CX (Medium 0.71mm, Tortoise Shell, Celluloid) Picks.

B.B. King’s Blues Club

In 1991, Beale Street developer John Elkington recruited B.B. King to Memphis to open the original B.B. King’s Blues Club, and in 1994, a second club was launched at Universal Citywalk in Los Angeles. A third club in New York City’s Times Square opened in June 2000. Two further clubs opened at Foxwoods Casino in Connecticut in January 2002. and another in Nashville in 2003. Another club opened in Orlando in 2007.] A club in West Palm Beach opened in the fall of 2009 and an additional one, based in the Mirage Hotel, Las Vegas, opened in the winter of 2009.

Television and other appearances

King made guest appearances in numerous popular television shows, including The Cosby Show, The Young and the Restless, General Hospital, The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Sesame Street, Married… with Children, Sanford and Son, and Touched by an Angel.
In 2000, the children’s show Between The Lions featured a singing character named “B.B. the King Of Beasts”, modeled on the real King.
A feature documentary about King narrated by Morgan Freeman and directed by Jon Brewer was released on October 15, 2012.
Commercials

King, who was diabetic, appeared in several television commercials for OneTouch Ultra, a blood glucose monitoring device, in the 2000s and early 2010s. He appeared in a 2014 commercial for the Toyota Camry with his guitar Lucille.

Personal life

King was married twice, to Martha Lee Denton, November 1946 to 1952, and to Sue Carol Hall, 1958 to 1966. The failure of both marriages has been attributed to the heavy demands made on the marriage by King’s 250 performances a year. It is reported that he fathered 15 children with several different women. King was also diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 1990. He lived with diabetes for over 20 years and was a high-profile spokesman in the fight against the disease, appearing in advertisements for diabetes-management products along with American Idol season nine contestant Crystal Bowersox.
King was an FAA certified private pilot and learned to fly in 1963 at what was then Chicago Hammond Airport in Lansing, Illinois. He frequently flew to gigs but in 1995 his insurance company and manager asked him to fly only with another certified pilot. As a result, he stopped flying around the age of 70.
King was a Christian.
King’s favorite singer was Frank Sinatra. In his autobiography he spoke about how he was a “Sinatra nut” and how he went to bed every night listening to Sinatra’s classic album In the Wee Small Hours. During the 1960s Sinatra had arranged for King to play at the main clubs in Las Vegas. He credited Sinatra for opening doors to black entertainers who were not given the chance to play in “white-dominated” venues.

Philanthropy and Notable Campaigns

In September 1970, King recorded Live in Cook County Jail, during a time in which issues of race and class in the prison system were prominent in politics. King also co-founded the Foundation for the Advancement of Inmate Rehabilitation and Recreation, tying in his support for prisoners and interest in prison reform. In addition to prison reform, King also wanted to utilize prison performances as a way to preserve music and songs in a similar way that Alan Lomax did.
In 2002, King signed on as an official supporter of Little Kids Rock, a nonprofit organization that provides free musical instruments and instruction to children in underprivileged public schools throughout the United States. He sat on the organization’s Honorary Board of Directors.
In the 2000’s to early 2010’s, King was involved in the spread of awareness of diabetes since his diagnosis in 1990. He was also involved in a diabetes awareness campaign with American Idol contestant, Crystal Bowersox, with One Touch Ultra, starring in commercials and spreading awareness about diabetes and promoting diabetes health management.

Illness and death
After the cancellation of the remaining eight shows of his 2014 tour because of health problems, King announced on October 8, 2014, he was back at home to recuperate. On May 1, 2015, after two hospitalizations caused by complications from high blood pressure and diabetes, King announced on his website that he was in hospice care at his home in Las Vegas, Nevada. He died in his sleep on May 14, 2015, at the age of 89.
King’s cause of death was determined to be multi-infarct dementia, brought on by a series of small strokes caused by atherosclerotic vascular disease as a consequence of type 2 diabetes. However, two of his daughters alleged that King was deliberately poisoned by two associates trying to induce diabetic shock. The Clark County coroner’s office confirmed on May 25, 2015, that it was performing an autopsy on King’s body and conducting a homicide investigation with the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, although CNN reported that initial indications did not support the notion of foul play. The autopsy revealed King’s death was of complications of Alzheimer’s disease and congestive heart failure, with no evidence of poisoning.
Funeral and burial

On May 27, 2015, King’s body was flown to Memphis. The funeral procession led down Beale Street, with a brass band marching in front of the hearse, playing “When the Saints Go Marching In”, as mourners called out “BB”. Rodd Bland, son of the late blues singer Bobby “Blue” Bland, carried the latest iteration of King’s famous guitar “Lucille.” Thousands lined the streets to pay their last respects. His body was then driven down Route 61 to his hometown of Indianola, Mississippi.
On May 29, 2015, King’s body was laid out, in a purple satin shirt and a floral tuxedo jacket, flanked by two black Gibson guitars, at the B.B. King Museum and Delta Interpretive Center, in Indianola. Fans lined up to view his open casket.
On May 30, 2015, King’s funeral was held at the Bell Grove Missionary Baptist Church in Indianola, Mississippi. He was buried at the B.B. King Museum.

Aftermath

King is alleged to have fathered 15 children by 15 different women; and after his death, three more have come forward, claiming King as their father as well. Though neither of his marriages produced children, and biographer Charles Sawyer wrote that doctors found his sperm count too low to conceive children,[106] King never disputed paternity of any of the 15 who claimed it, and by all accounts was generous in bankrolling college tuitions and establishing trust funds.
In May 2016, the 11 surviving children initiated legal proceedings against King’s appointed trustee over his estimated $30 million to $40 million estate. Several of them also went public with the allegation that King’s business manager, LaVerne Toney, and his personal assistant, Myron Johnson, had fatally poisoned him. When autopsy results showed no evidence of poisoning, the suit was dismissed; a defamation suit filed by Johnson against the accusing family members (including his own sister, Karen Williams) is pending. Other children have filed lawsuits targeting King’s music estate, which remains in dispute.

B.B. King discography

Studio albums

* Singin’ the Blues (1956)
* The Blues (1958)
* B.B. King Wails (1959)
* King of the Blues (1960)
* Sings Spirituals (1960)
* The Great B.B. King (1960)
* My Kind of Blues (1961)
* Blues For Me (1961)
* Blues in My Heart (1962)
* Easy Listening Blues (1962)
* B.B. King (1963)
* Mr. Blues (1963)
* Confessin’ the Blues (1966)
* Blues on Top of Blues (1968)
* Lucille (1968)
* Live & Well (1969)
* Completely Well (1969)
* Indianola Mississippi Seeds (1970)
* B.B. King in London (1971)
* L.A. Midnight (1972)
* Guess Who (1972)
* To Know You Is to Love You (1973)
* Friends (1974)
* Lucille Talks Back (1975)
* King Size (1977)
* Midnight Believer (1978)
* Take It Home (1979)
* There Must Be a Better World Somewhere (1981)
* Love Me Tender (1982)
* Blues ‘N’ Jazz (1983)
* Six Silver Strings (1985)
* King of the Blues: 1989 (1988)
* There Is Always One More Time (1991)
* Blues Summit (1993)
* Lucille & Friends (1995)
* Deuces Wild (1997)
* Blues on the Bayou (1998)
* Let the Good Times Roll (1999)
* Makin’ Love Is Good for You (2000)
* Riding with the King (2000, with Eric Clapton)
* A Christmas Celebration of Hope (2001)
* Reflections (2003)
* B.B. King & Friends: 80 (2005)
* One Kind Favor (2008)

Accolades

Awards and nominations

Years reflect the year in which the Grammy was awarded, for music released in the previous year.
Grammy Awards
Year
Category
Work
Result
1971
Best Male R&B Vocal Performance
“The Thrill Is Gone”
Won
1981
Best R&B Instrumental Performance
“When I’m Wrong”
Nominated
1982
Best Ethnic or Traditional Recording
“There Must Be a Better World Somewhere”
Won
1983
Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals
“Street Life”
Nominated
1984
Best Traditional Blues Recording
Blues ‘n Jazz
Won
1986
My Guitar Sings the Blues
Won
1991
Live at San Quentin
Won
1991
Best Country Collaboration with Vocals
“Waiting on the Light to Change”
Nominated
1992
Best Traditional Blues Album
Live at the Apollo
Won
1994
Blues Summit
Won
1995
Best Country Collaboration with Vocals
“Patches”
Nominated
1997
Best Rock Instrumental Performance
“SRV Shuffle”
Won
1999
Best Contemporary Blues Album
Deuces Wild
Nominated
2000
Best Traditional Blues Album
Blues on the Bayou
Won
2001
Best Traditional Blues Album
Riding with the King
Won
2001
Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals
“Is You or Is You Ain’t (Baby)”
Won
2003
Best Traditional Blues Album
A Christmas Celebration of Hope
Won
2003
Best Pop Instrumental Performance
“Auld Lang Syne”
Won
2005
Best Traditional R&B Performance
“Sinner’s Prayer” (with Ray Charles)
Nominated
2006
Best Traditional Blues Album
B. B. King & Friends: 80
Won
2009
Best Traditional Blues Album
One Kind Favor
Won
Other awards
Year
Association
Category
Work
Result
1995
Country Music Association
Album of the Year
Rhythm, Country and Blues (“Patches” with George Jones)
Nominated
2002
NAACP Image Awards
Outstanding Performance in a Youth/Children’s Series or Special
Sesame Street
Nominated

B.B. King receiving the Presidential Medal of Freedom from George W. Bush, December 2006
Other honors

* 1977: Honorary Doctor of Music by Yale University
* 1980: Inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame
* 1987: Inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame
* 1987: Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award
* 1990: The National Medal of Arts
* 1991: The National Heritage Fellowship from the NEA
* 1995: The Kennedy Center Honors; given to recognize “the lifelong accomplishments and extraordinary talents of our nation’s most prestigious artists”[114]
* 1998: Grammy Hall of Fame Award for “The Thrill is Gone”; the award is given to recordings that are at least 25 years old and that have “qualitative or historical significance”
* 2004: The Royal Swedish Academy of Music awarded him the Polar Music Prize for his “significant contributions to the blues”
* 2006: The Presidential Medal of Freedom awarded by President George W. Bush on December 15
* 2007: An honorary doctorate in music by Brown University (May 27)
* 2008: The keys to the city of Portland, Maine (May 14)
* 2009: Time named King No. 3 on its list of the 10 best electric guitarists
* 2010: Sabrosa Park (in the small town of Sabrosa, north of Portugal) was renamed B.B. King Park in honor of King and the free concert he played before 20,000 people on May 29
* Each year during the first week in June, a King Homecoming Festival is held in Indianola, Mississippi
* A Mississippi Blues Trail marker was added for King, commemorating his birthplace

 

The Carpenters 1946/1950

The Carpenters were both born at Grace-New Haven Hospital (now called Yale-New Haven Hospital) in New Haven, Connecticut, to parents Harold and Agnes. Richard Lynn was born on October 15, 1946, and Karen Anne followed on March 2, 1950.Richard was a quiet child who spent most of his time in the house listening to records and playing the piano. Karen, on the other hand, was friendly and outgoing; she liked to play sports, including softball with the neighborhood kids, but she also spent a lot of time listening to music.

1940-1949

Why I Texted about the 1940’s is John Lennon, Paul McCarney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Rodger Daltey, David Bowie, David Jones, Micky Dolans, Mike Nesmith, Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix and others were born in the 1940’s. Don’t you think that they got their influence from the 1940’s ???

Well I believe so and I’m going to continue doing it !!!

1945

WE WON THE WAR, HEY !!!

1946

There was still singing patriot songs, Big Band was still going strong, Radio Shows and movie industry were supporting the US troops. The reporters were, for the last time, were building up morals in the military and The American people, I wish we could go back and have a president that leads us to victory in our world today, like the Presidents before him, then ISIS would never be formed, but I guess Joe Byner, has a fool for his vi

1947

After two years after WWII, The USA and around the world, were still at ease that the war was over !!!

1940-1959

Wow, my first 20 years !!!

Your might wonder why I’m I have done 1940-1959 when this website is called 60srocknroll.com, well I figured that my Rock’N’Roll heroes grew up in the 1940’s and 1950’s, thy might have listened to these preformers and was inspired to write songs and play instruments, so how can I truly text about the 1960’s without texting about the 1940’s and 1950’s. So let me continue until 1940, so I can text about the 1960’s 1970’s and 1980’s, for the 1960’s inspired and changed the music and entertainment for decades to come !!!

1948

The war was over three years ago, and the movie industry, Radio stations and music was still being patriotic. Their was school prayers and  salute to The American Flag. I don’t want to live in the 1940’s, but I wish we had that feeling of patriotic today, because we sure can use it !!!

1949

not much happen new in 1949, however the preformers of WWII were still still making hits, until 1956, but that’s another story !!!

This theme is sponsored by Things to do in denver along with Adult hits radio, Corporation Offices and logo search