Archive for the ‘20’s Bands’ Category

Glenn Miller

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Glenn Miller
Born March 1, 1904
Clarinda, Iowa, United States
Died December 15, 1944 (aged 40)
Plane missing over the English Channel
Genres Swing music, big band
Occupations Bandleader, Musician, Arranger, Composer
Instruments Trombone
Years active 1923–1944
Associated acts Glenn Miller Orchestra, The Modernaires, Marion Hutton
Alton Glenn Miller (March 1, 1904 – missing in action December 15, 1944) was an American big band musician, arranger, composer, and bandleader in the swing era. He was the best-selling recording artist from 1939 to 1943, leading one of the best known big bands. Miller’s recordings include “In the Mood”, “Moonlight Serenade”, “Pennsylvania 6-5000”, “Chattanooga Choo Choo”, “A String of Pearls”, “At Last”, “(I’ve Got a Gal In) Kalamazoo”, “American Patrol”, “Tuxedo Junction”, “Elmer’s Tune”, and “Little Brown Jug”. While he was traveling to entertain U.S. troops in France during World War II, Glenn Miller’s aircraft disappeared in bad weather over the English Channel.

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Count Basie

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From the 1955 film Rhythm and Blues Revue

Birth name William James Basie
Born August 21, 1904
Red Bank, New Jersey, United States
Died April 26, 1984 (aged 79)
Hollywood, Florida, United States
Genres Jazz, swing, big band, piano blues
Occupations Musician, bandleader, composer
Instruments Piano, organ
Years active 1924–1984
William James “Count” Basie (August 21, 1904 – April 26, 1984) was an American jazz pianist, organist, bandleader, and composer. His mother taught him to play the piano and he started performing in his teens. Dropping out of school, he learned to operate lights for vaudeville and to improvise accompaniment for silent films at a local movie theater in his home town of Red Bank, New Jersey. By 16 years old, he increasingly played jazz piano at parties, resorts and other venues. In 1924, he went to Harlem, where his performing career expanded; he toured with groups to the major jazz cities of Chicago, St. Louis and Kansas City. In 1929 he joined Bennie Moten’s band in Kansas City, and played with them until Moten’s death in 1935.

In 1935, Basie formed his own jazz orchestra, the Count Basie Orchestra, and in 1936 took them to Chicago for a long engagement and their first recording. He led the group for almost 50 years, creating innovations like the use of two “split” tenor saxophones, emphasizing the rhythm section, riffing with a big band, using arrangers to broaden their sound, and others. Many musicians came to prominence under his direction, including the tenor saxophonists Lester Young and Herschel Evans, the guitarist Freddie Green, trumpeters Buck Clayton and Harry “Sweets” Edison and singers Jimmy Rushing and Joe Williams. Basie’s theme songs were “One O’Clock Jump”, developed in 1935 in the early days of his band, and later “April in Paris”.

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The Andrews Sisters

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LaVerne: July 6, 1911
Maxene: January 3, 1916
Patty: February 16, 1918
Mound, Minnesota
Origin Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
Died LaVerne: May 8, 1967 (aged 55), Los Angeles, California
Maxene: October 21, 1995 (aged 79), Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Patty: January 30, 2013 (aged 94), Los Angeles
Genres Swing, boogie-woogie
Years active 1925–1951, 1956–1967
Website www.cmgww.com/music/andrews
The Andrews Sisters were an American close harmony singing group of the swing and boogie-woogie eras. The group consisted of three sisters: contralto LaVerne Sophia (July 6, 1911 – May 8, 1967), soprano Maxine Angelyn “Maxene” (January 3, 1916 – October 21, 1995), and mezzo-soprano Patricia Marie “Patty” (February 16, 1918 – January 30, 2013). Throughout their long career, the sisters sold well over 75 million records (the last official count released by MCA Records in the mid-1970s). Their 1941 hit “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy” can be considered an early example of rhythm and blues or jump blues.

The Andrews Sisters’ harmonies and songs are still influential today, and have been covered by entertainers such as Bette Midler, Christina Aguilera, and others. The group was inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 1998. Writing for Bloomberg, Mark Schoifet said the sisters became the most popular female vocal group of the first half of the 20th century. They are still widely acclaimed today for their famous close harmonies.

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