Archive for the ‘60’s Singers’ Category

Bobby Sherman

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Sherman in 1969.
Background information
Birth name Robert Cabot Sherman, Jr.
Born July 22, 1943 (age 72)
Santa Monica, California, U.S.
Genres Pop
Occupation(s) Singer, Actor
Years active 1964–1995
Labels Various; see Discography
Associated acts David Cassidy, The Monkees
Robert Cabot “Bobby” Sherman, Jr. (born July 22, 1943) is an American singer, actor and occasional songwriter, who became a popular teen idol in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

He graduated in 1961 from Birmingham High School in Van Nuys, California. Sherman attended Pierce College in Woodland Hills, California.

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Marvin Sease

Birth name Marvin Sease
Born February 16, 1946
Blackville, South Carolina, US
Died February 8, 2011 (aged 64)
Vicksburg, Mississippi, United States
Genres Gospel, blues, soul
Occupation Singer
Instruments Vocals
Years active 1966–2011
Labels Polygram Records
Mercury Records
Jive Records
Malaco Records
Marvin Sease (February 16, 1946 – February 8, 2011)[1] was an American blues and soul singer-songwriter known for his gospel-infused vocal style and erotic-oriented lyrics.

Born in Blackville, South Carolina,[p Sease started as a gospel artist, joining a gospel group called the Five Gospel Crowns, located in Charleston, South Carolina. After singing with them, Sease then left at age 20 for New York City. At this young age settling into New York, he then joined another gospel group called the Gospel Crowns. Having a preference for the musical style of R&B, Sease left the gospel circuit to form his own R&B group. In this group Sease was accompanied by his own three brothers, and named the backing band Naglfar. This band did not find popularity and eventually broke up. He did not quit performing musically, but began to cover songs that started a career with a recurring gig at the Brooklyn club, Casablanca.

In 1986, he recorded a self-titled album, featuring one of his more popular songs, “Ghetto Man”. This started his professional career with his fans in the South’s circuit of bars, blues festivals, and juke joints. While promoting his self produced and publicized debut album, he entered a recording contract with Polygram. With this contract, he was able to launch his music nationally with the re-release of his self-titled LP on Mercury Records in 1987. This updated release of his previous material also included the new ten-minute track “Candy Licker”, which became an instant success for Sease through the South. Success had finally come to Sease without the help of airplay, which deemed his sound too explicit for the audience. Over the next decade Sease released several more records for Mercury and Jive Records, which ranked on the US Billboard R&B chart. Sease’s success was notably linked with his chart-topping song “Candy Licker”, and ensured a strong female-based following.

He was said to have a comparable sound to Johnnie Taylor and Tyrone Davis, but without the commercial success.

Sease died of complications from pneumonia in Vicksburg, Mississippi, on February 8, 2011, eight days before his 65th birthday.

There was a poster depicting Sease in the film, Pretty in Pink.

James Taylor

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Taylor in the mid-1970s
Background information
Birth name James Vernon Taylor
Born March 12, 1948 (age 68)
Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Origin Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Genres Folk rock, rock, pop, soft rock, blues, country
Occupations Singer-songwriter, musician
Instruments Vocals, guitar, harmonica
Years active 1966–present
Labels Apple, Capitol, EMI, Warner Bros., Columbia, SME, Hear Music
Associated acts Carole King, Carly Simon, Peter Asher, Joni Mitchell
Website jamestaylor.com
James Vernon Taylor (born March 12, 1948) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist. A five-time Grammy Award winner, Taylor was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2000. He is one of the best-selling artists of all time, having sold more than 100 million records worldwide.

Taylor achieved his breakthrough in 1970 with the No. 3 single “Fire and Rain” and had his first No. 1 hit the following year with “You’ve Got a Friend”, a recording of Carole King’s classic song. His 1976 Greatest Hits album was certified Diamond and has sold 12 million US copies. Following his 1977 album, JT, he has retained a large audience over the decades. Every album he released from 1977 to 2006 sold over a million copies. His chart performance had a resurgence during the late 1990s and 2000s, when he recorded some of his most-awarded work (including Hourglass, October Road and Covers). He achieved his first number one album in the US in 2015 with his recording Before This World.

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Toni Basil

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Toni Basil
Born Antonia Christina Basilotta
September 22, 1943 (age 72)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Occupation
Singer dancer actress choreographer film director
Years active 1964–present
Home town Las Vegas, Nevada
Musical career
Genres
Pop new wave
Labels
Chrysalis Records Virgin
Associated acts
Devo The Lockers
Website Toni Basil’s Site
Antonia Christina Basilotta (born September 22, 1943), better known by her stage name Toni Basil, is an American singer-songwriter, actress, filmmaker, film director, choreographer, and dancer, best known for her multi-million selling worldwide No. 1 hit “Mickey” from 1982.

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Lesley Gore

Born Lesley Sue Goldstein
May 2, 1946
Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States
Died February 16, 2015 (aged 68)
Manhattan, New York City, U.S.
Cause of death Lung cancer
Education Sarah Lawrence, 1968
Occupation
Singer songwriter actress activist
Years active 1963–2014
Notable work “It’s My Party” , “Judy’s Turn to Cry” , “You Don’t Own Me”.
Partner Lois Sasson
(1982–2015; Gore’s death)
Parent(s) Leo Goldstein
Ronny Gore
Relatives Michael Gore (brother)
Alan Dean Foster (cousin)
Website lesleygore.com
Musical career
Genres
Pop rock
Instruments Vocals
Labels
Mercury Mowest A&M
Lesley Sue Goldstein (May 2, 1946 – February 16, 2015), better known as Lesley Gore, was an American singer, songwriter, actress, and activist. At the age of 16, in 1963, she recorded the pop hit “It’s My Party”, and followed it up with other hits including “Judy’s Turn to Cry”, “You Don’t Own Me”, and “California Nights”.

Gore also worked as an actress and composed songs with her brother Michael Gore for the 1980 film Fame, for which she was nominated for an Academy Award. She hosted an LGBT-oriented public television show, In the Life, on American TV in the 2000s, and was active until 2014.

Jim Croce

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Jim Croce in 1972, photographed by Ingrid Croce.
Background information
Birth name James Joseph Croce
Born January 10, 1943
South Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.
Died September 20, 1973 (aged 30)
Natchitoches, Louisiana, U.S.
Genres Folk, rock, folk rock, Country and western, soft rock
Occupations Singer-songwriter
Instruments Guitar, vocals
Years active 1966–1973
Labels Capitol/EMI Records, ABC Records, Saja/Atlantic Records
Website www.jimcroce.com
James Joseph “Jim” Croce (/ˈkroʊtʃi/; January 10, 1943 – September 20, 1973) was an American folk and popular rock singer of the late 1960s and early 1970s. Between 1966 and 1973, Croce released five studio albums and 11 singles. His singles “Bad, Bad Leroy Brown” and “Time in a Bottle” both reached No. 1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart.

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Jeannie C. Riley

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Riley at the Civic Center, Lansing, Michigan on February 4, 1973
Background information
Birth name Jeanne Carolyn Stephenson
Born October 19, 1945 (age 70)
Stamford, Texas, United States
Origin Anson, Texas, United States
Genres Country music, gospel
Occupation Singer
Years active 1967–present
Labels Little Darlin Records
Plantation Records
Capitol Records
MGM Records
Mercury Records
Warner Bros. Records
MCA Records
Associated acts Connie Smith, Dottie West, Jeannie Seely, Loretta Lynn
Website JeannieC.com
Jeannie C. Riley (born Jeanne Carolyn Stephenson, October 19, 1945) is an American country music and gospel singer. She is best known for her 1968 country and pop hit “Harper Valley PTA” (written by Tom T. Hall), which missed (by one week) becoming the Billboard Country and Pop number one hit at the same time. In subsequent years, she had moderate chart success with country music, but never again duplicated the success of “Harper Valley PTA”. She became a born-again Christian and began recording gospel music during the late 1970s.

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Harry Chapin

Birth name Harry Forster Chapin
Born December 7, 1942
Brooklyn, New York City, United States
Died July 16, 1981 (aged 38)
Jericho, New York, United States
Genres Folk, folk rock
Occupations Musician
Composer
Arranger
Author
Humanitarian
Playwright
Instruments Vocals, guitar, piano, harmonica
Years active 1962–1981
Labels Elektra Records, Boardwalk Records, Sequel Records, DCC Compact Classics, Chapin Productions
Website http://www.harrychapinmusic.com
Harry Forster Chapin (December 7, 1942 – July 16, 1981) was an American singer-songwriter best known for his folk rock songs including “Taxi”, “W*O*L*D”, “Sniper”, “Flowers Are Red”, and the No. 1 hit “Cat’s in the Cradle”. Chapin was also a dedicated humanitarian who fought to end world hunger; he was a key participant in the creation of the Presidential Commission on World Hunger in 1977. In 1987, Chapin was posthumously awarded the Congressional Gold Medal for his humanitarian work.

Eric Clapton

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Clapton performing at Hyde Park, London in June 2008
Background information
Birth name Eric Patrick Clapton
Born 30 March 1945 (age 70)
Ripley, Surrey, England
Genres
Rock blues
Occupations
Guitarist singer songwriter record producer
Instruments
Guitar vocals
Years active 1962–present
Labels
Surfdog Warner Bros. Reprise Polydor RSO Atco Apple
Associated acts
The Yardbirds John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers Cream Blind Faith Delaney & Bonnie and Friends Derek and the Dominos JJ Cale B.B. King
Website www.ericclapton.com
Notable instruments
See: Guitars section
Gibson Les Paul
Gibson SG (“The Fool”)
Fender Stratocaster (“Blackie”, “Brownie”, custom signature model)
1939 Martin 000-42 acoustic
Eric Patrick Clapton, CBE (born 30 March 1945), is an English rock and blues guitarist, singer and songwriter. He is the only three-time inductee to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: once as a solo artist and separately as a member of the Yardbirds and Cream. Clapton has been referred to as one of the most important and influential guitarists of all time. Clapton ranked second in Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time” and fourth in Gibson’s “Top 50 Guitarists of All Time”. He was also named number five in Time magazine’s list of “The 10 Best Electric Guitar Players” in 2009.

In the mid-1960s, Clapton left the Yardbirds to play blues with John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers. Immediately after leaving Mayall, Clapton formed the power trio Cream with drummer Ginger Baker and bassist Jack Bruce, in which Clapton played sustained blues improvisations and “arty, blues-based psychedelic pop”. Furthermore, he formed blues rock band Blind Faith with Baker, Steve Winwood, and Ric Grech. For most of the 1970s, Clapton’s output bore the influence of the mellow style of JJ Cale and the reggae of Bob Marley. His version of Marley’s “I Shot the Sheriff” helped reggae reach a mass market. Two of his most popular recordings were “Layla”, recorded with Derek and the Dominos; and Robert Johnson’s “Crossroads”, recorded with Cream. Following the death of his son Conor in 1991, Clapton’s grief was expressed in the song “Tears in Heaven”, which featured in his Unplugged album.

Clapton has been the recipient of 18 Grammy Awards, and the Brit Award for Outstanding Contribution to Music. In 2004, he was awarded a CBE at Buckingham Palace for services to music. In 1998, Clapton, a recovering alcoholic and drug addict, founded the Crossroads Centre on Antigua, a medical facility for recovering substance abusers.

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Donna Summer

Birth name LaDonna Adrian Gaines
Also known as
Queen of Disco Donna Gaines
Born December 31, 1948
Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
Died May 17, 2012 (aged 63)
Naples, Florida, U.S.
Genres
Disco R&B
Occupations
Singer songwriter painter
Instruments Vocals
Years active 1968–2012
Labels
Oasis Casablanca Geffen Atlantic Mercury WEA Epic Burgundy
Associated acts
Giorgio Moroder Brooklyn Dreams
LaDonna Adrian Gaines (December 31, 1948 – May 17, 2012), known by her stage name Donna Summer, was an American singer, songwriter, and painter. She gained prominence during the disco era of the late-1970s. A five-time Grammy Award winner, she was the first artist to have three consecutive double albums reach No. 1 on the United States Billboard album chart and charted four number-one singles in the U.S. within a 12-month period. Summer has reportedly sold over 140 million records, making her one of the world’s best-selling artists of all time.

While influenced by the counterculture of the 1960s, she became the front singer of a psychedelic rock band named Crow and moved to New York City. Joining a touring version of the musical Hair, she left New York and spent several years living, acting, and singing in Europe, where she met music producers, Giorgio Moroder and Pete Bellotte.

Summer returned to the U.S., in 1975 with commercial success of the song ‘Love to Love You Baby’, followed by a string of other hits, such as “I Feel Love”, “Last Dance”, “MacArthur Park”, “Heaven Knows”, “Hot Stuff”, “Bad Girls”, “Dim All the Lights”, “No More Tears (Enough Is Enough)” (duet with Barbra Streisand), and “On the Radio”. She became known as the “Queen of Disco”, while her music gained a global following.[3]

Summer died on May 17, 2012, at her home in Naples, Florida. In her obituary in The Times, she was described as the “undisputed queen of the Seventies disco boom” who reached the status of “one of the world’s leading female singers.” Moroder described Summer’s work with him on the song ‘I Feel Love’ as “really the start of electronic dance” music. In 2013, Summer was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

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