Archive for the ‘70’s Bands’ Category

Air Suppy

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Two man standing at microphones, both are shown facing slightly to the right. Male at left has a guitar and is resting his left arm over it. The second male is shorter and has a moustache.
Graham Russell (left) and Russell Hitchcock (right) of Air Supply, 2006
Background information
Origin Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Genres Soft rock, pop rock
Years active 1975–present
Labels Arista, Giant, A Nice Pear, EMI
Website www.airsupplymusic.com
Members Russell Hitchcock
Graham Russell
Past members Jeremy Paul
Jeff Browne
Mark McEntee
Adrian Scott
Nigel Macara
Brenton White
Alan Kendall
Joey Carbone
Robin LeMesurier
Howard Sukimoto
David Moyse
Ralph Cooper
Criston Barker
Frank Esler-Smith
David Green
Rex Goh
Brian Hamilton
Don Cromwell
Wally Stocker
Joey Murcia
George Terry
Harold Cowart
Jed Moss
CJ Burton
Guy Allison
Jimmy Haun
Air Supply is an Australian soft rock duo, consisting of British-born singer-songwriter and guitarist Graham Russell and lead vocalist Russell Hitchcock. They had a succession of hits worldwide, including eight Top Ten hits in the United States, in the early 1980s. They formed in Australia in 1975 and have included various accompanying musicians and singers. The Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) inducted Air Supply into their Hall of Fame on 1 December, 2013 at the annual ARIA Awards.

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Electric Lights Orchestra

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ELO performing live, during their Time Tour in 1981.
Background information
Also known as
ELO
Jeff Lynne’s ELO
Origin Birmingham, West Midlands, England
Genres
Symphonic rock progressive rock progressive pop art rock
Years active
1970–1986 2000–2001 2012-present
Labels
Harvest Warner Bros. United Artists Jet Columbia Epic Legacy Sony BMG
Associated acts
The Move ELO Part II The Orchestra The Idle Race Olivia Newton-John
Website jefflynneselo.com
Members
Jeff Lynne
Richard Tandy
Past members See members section
The Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) are a British rock group from Birmingham, England. They were formed to accommodate Roy Wood’s and Jeff Lynne’s desire to create modern rock and pop songs with classical overtones. After Wood’s departure following the band’s debut record, Lynne wrote and arranged all of the group’s original compositions and produced every album. In 2012, Lynne reformed the band under the moniker Jeff Lynne’s ELO.

Despite early singles’ success in the United Kingdom, the band was initially more successful in the United States, where they were billed as “The English guys with the big fiddles”. From 1972 to 1986, ELO accumulated twenty Top 20 songs on the UK Singles Chart, and fifteen Top 20 songs on the US Billboard Hot 100. The band also holds the record for having the most Billboard Hot 100 Top 40 hits, 20, of any group in US chart history without having a number one single.

ELO collected 19 CRIA, 21 RIAA and 38 BPI awards, and sold over 50 million records worldwide during the group’s original 13-year period of active recording and touring.

Blondie

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Blondie in 1977. L-R: Gary Valentine, Clem Burke, Debbie Harry, Chris Stein, and Jimmy Destri.
Background information
Origin New York, New York, U.S.
Genres
New wave punk rock
Years active 1974–1982
1997–present
Labels
Private Stock Chrysalis EMI Beyond BMG Epic Sanctuary Eleven Seven
Associated acts
The Wind in the Willows The Jazz Passengers
Website blondie.net
Members Debbie Harry
Chris Stein
Clem Burke
Leigh Foxx
Matt Katz-Bohen
Tommy Kessler
Past members See: Former members
Blondie is an American rock band founded by singer Debbie Harry and guitarist Chris Stein. The band was a pioneer in the early American new wave and punk scenes of the mid-late 1970s. Its first two albums contained strong elements of these genres, and although successful in the United Kingdom and Australia, Blondie was regarded as an underground band in the United States until the release of Parallel Lines in 1978. Over the next three years, the band achieved several hit singles including “Call Me”, “Atomic” and “Heart of Glass” and became noted for its eclectic mix of musical styles incorporating elements of disco, pop, rap, and reggae, while retaining a basic style as a new wave band.

Blondie broke up after the release of its sixth studio album The Hunter in 1982. Debbie Harry continued to pursue a solo career with varied results after taking a few years off to care for partner Chris Stein, who was diagnosed with pemphigus, a rare autoimmune disease of the skin.

The band re-formed in 1997, achieving renewed success and a number one single in the United Kingdom with “Maria” in 1999, exactly 20 years after their first UK No.1 single (“Heart of Glass”).

The group toured and performed throughout the world during the following years, and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2006. Blondie has sold 40 million records worldwide and is still active today. The band’s ninth studio album, Panic of Girls, was released in 2011, and their tenth, Ghosts of Download, was released in 2014.

The Queen

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London, England
Genres Rock
Years active 1970–present
Labels
EMI Parlophone Elektra Capitol Hollywood Island
Associated acts
Smile The Cross Queen + Paul Rodgers Queen + Adam Lambert
Website queenonline.com
Members Brian May
Roger Taylor
Past members Freddie Mercury
John Deacon
See also: Early members
Queen are a British rock band that formed in London in 1970. The classic line-up was Freddie Mercury (lead vocals, piano), Brian May (guitar, vocals), Roger Taylor (drums, vocals), and John Deacon (bass guitar). Queen’s earliest works were influenced by progressive rock, hard rock and heavy metal, but the band gradually ventured into more conventional and radio-friendly works by incorporating further styles, such as arena rock and pop rock, into their music.

Before forming Queen, Brian May and Roger Taylor had played together in a band named Smile. Freddie Mercury (then known by his birth name of Farrokh “Freddie” Bulsara) was a fan of Smile and encouraged them to experiment with more elaborate stage and recording techniques. Mercury joined the band in 1970, suggested “Queen” as a new band name, and adopted his familiar stage name. John Deacon was recruited prior to recording their eponymous debut album in 1973. Queen first charted in the UK with their second album, Queen II, in 1974, but it was the release of Sheer Heart Attack later that year and A Night at the Opera in 1975 which brought them international success. The latter featured “Bohemian Rhapsody”, which stayed at number one in the UK for nine weeks and popularised the music video. Their 1977 album, News of the World, contained “We Will Rock You” and “We Are the Champions”, which have become anthems at sporting events. By the early 1980s, Queen were one of the biggest stadium rock bands in the world. Their performance at 1985’s Live Aid is ranked among the greatest in rock history by various music publications, with a 2005 industry poll ranking it the best. In 1991, Mercury died of bronchopneumonia, a complication of AIDS, and Deacon retired in 1997. Since then, May and Taylor have occasionally performed together, including with Paul Rodgers (2004–09) and with Adam Lambert (since 2011). In November 2014, Queen released a new album, Queen Forever, featuring vocals from the late Mercury.

The band have released a total of 18 number one albums, 18 number one singles, and 10 number one DVDs. Estimates of their record sales generally range from 150 million to 300 million records, making them one of the world’s best-selling music artists. Queen received the Outstanding Contribution to British Music Award from the British Phonographic Industry in 1990. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2001.

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Kiss (Group)

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Kiss playing at Hellfest 2013, during their Monster World Tour. From left to right: Gene Simmons, Paul Stanley, Eric Singer and Tommy Thayer
Background information
Origin New York City, New York, United States
Genres Hard rock, heavy metal, glam metal
Years active 1973–present
Labels Casablanca, Mercury, Roadrunner, Kiss, Universal Music Group
Associated acts E.S.P., Frehley’s Comet, Union, Vinnie Vincent Invasion, Wicked Lester, Alice Cooper, Black Sabbath, White Tiger, Black ‘n Blue, Avantasia, Badlands, Blackjack
Website kissonline.com
Members
Paul Stanley
Gene Simmons
Eric Singer
Tommy Thayer
Past members
Ace Frehley
Peter Criss
Eric Carr
Vinnie Vincent
Mark St. John
Bruce Kulick
Kiss (often styled as KISS) is an American hard rock band formed in New York City in January 1973 by Paul Stanley and Gene Simmons. Well known for its members’ face paint and stage outfits, the group rose to prominence in the mid-to-late 1970s with their elaborate live performances—which featured fire breathing, blood-spitting, smoking guitars, shooting rockets, levitating drum kits, and pyrotechnics. The band has gone through multiple lineup changes, with Stanley and Simmons the only remaining original members. Counting the 1978 solo albums, Kiss has been awarded 30 gold albums to date, the most of any American band. The band has sold more than 40 million albums in the United States, of which 25 million have been certified by the RIAA and their worldwide sales exceed 100 million records, making them one of the world’s best-selling bands of all time. The original and best-known lineup consisted of Stanley (lead vocals and rhythm guitar), Simmons (vocals and bass guitar), Ace Frehley (lead guitar and vocals) and Peter Criss (drums and vocals).

With their make-up and costumes, they took on the personae of comic book-style characters: The Starchild (Stanley), The Demon (Simmons), The Spaceman or Space Ace (Frehley) and The Catman (Criss). Stanley became the “Starchild” because of his tendency to be referred to as a “starry-eyed lover” and “hopeless romantic”. The “Demon” make-up reflected Simmons’ cynicism and dark sense of humor, as well as his affection for comic books. Frehley’s “Space Ace” make-up was a reflection of his fondness for science fiction and his supposedly being from another planet. Criss’ “Catman” make-up was in accordance with the belief that he had nine lives, because of his rough childhood in Brooklyn. Due to creative differences, both Criss and Frehley departed the group by 1982. The band’s commercial fortunes had waned considerably by that point.

Buoyed by a wave of Kiss nostalgia in the 1990s, the band announced a reunion of the original lineup in 1996. The resulting Kiss Alive/Worldwide Tour was the top-grossing act of 1996 and 1997. Criss and Frehley have both since left the band again and have been replaced by Eric Singer and Tommy Thayer, respectively. Kiss has been named in many “Top” lists. These include Number 10 on VH1’s “100 Greatest Artists of Hard Rock”, 9th on “The Greatest Metal Bands” list by MTV, number one on Hit Paraders’s “Top 100 Live Bands”, 56th on VH1’s “100 Greatest Artists Of All Time”, and 26th on Gibson’s “50 Greatest American Rock Bands”. On April 10, 2014, Kiss was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

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Aerosmith

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Background information
Origin Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
Genres Hard rock, blues rock, heavy metal, glam metal
Years active 1970–present
Labels Columbia, Geffen
Associated acts The Strangeurs/Chain Reaction, the Jam Band, The Joe Perry Project, Whitford/St. Holmes, the Jimmy Crespo Project
Website aerosmith.com
Members Steven Tyler
Joe Perry
Brad Whitford
Tom Hamilton
Joey Kramer
Past members Ray Tabano
Jimmy Crespo
Rick Dufay
Aerosmith is an American rock band, sometimes referred to as “the Bad Boys from Boston” and “America’s Greatest Rock and Roll Band.”Their style, which is rooted in blues-based hard rock, has come to also incorporate elements of pop, heavy metal, and rhythm and blues, and has inspired many subsequent rock artists. The band was formed in Boston, Massachusetts in 1970. Guitarist Joe Perry and bassist Tom Hamilton, originally in a band together called the Jam Band, met up with vocalist/pianist/harmonicist Steven Tyler, drummer Joey Kramer, and guitarist Ray Tabano, and formed Aerosmith. In 1971, Tabano was replaced by Brad Whitford, and the band began developing a following in Boston.

They were signed to Columbia Records in 1972, and released a string of gold and platinum albums, beginning with their 1973 eponymous debut album, followed by Get Your Wings in 1974. In 1975, the band broke into the mainstream with the album Toys in the Attic, and their 1976 follow-up Rocks cemented their status as hard rock superstars. Two additional albums followed in 1977 and 1979. Their first five albums have since attained multi-platinum status. Throughout the 1970s, the band toured extensively and charted a dozen Hot 100 singles. By the end of the decade, they were among the most popular hard rock bands in the world and developed a loyal following of fans, often referred to as the “Blue Army”. However, drug addiction and internal conflict took their toll on the band, which led to the departures of Perry and Whitford in 1979 and 1981, respectively; they were replaced by Jimmy Crespo and Rick Dufay. The band did not fare well between 1980 and 1984, releasing the album Rock in a Hard Place, which was certified gold but failed to match their previous successes.

Perry and Whitford returned to Aerosmith in 1984 and the band signed a new deal with Geffen Records. After a comeback tour, the band recorded Done with Mirrors (1985), which won some critical praise but failed to come close to commercial expectations. It was not until the band’s collaboration with rap group Run–D.M.C. in 1986, and the 1987 multi-platinum release Permanent Vacation, that they regained the level of popularity they had experienced in the 1970s. In the late 1980s and 1990s, the band scored several hits and won numerous awards for music from the multi-platinum albums Pump (1989), Get a Grip (1993), and Nine Lives (1997), and embarked on their most extensive concert tours to date. The band also became a pop culture phenomenon with popular music videos and notable appearances in television, film, and video games. Their comeback has been described as one of the most remarkable and spectacular in rock ‘n’ roll history. Additional albums followed in 2001, 2004, and 2012. Since 2001, the band has toured every year except 2008. After 46 years of performing, the band continues to tour and record music.

Aerosmith is the best-selling American hard rock band of all time, having sold more than 150 million records worldwide, including over 70 million records in the United States alone. With 25 gold albums, 18 platinum albums, and 12 multi-platinum albums, they hold the record for the most total certifications by an American group and are tied for the most multi-platinum albums by an American group. The band has scored 21 Top 40 hits on the Billboard Hot 100, nine number-one Mainstream Rock hits, four Grammy Awards, six American Music Awards, and ten MTV Video Music Awards. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2001, and were included among both Rolling Stone’s and VH1’s lists of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time. In 2013, the band’s principal songwriters, Tyler and Perry, were inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame.

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Abba

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ABBA in 1974 (from left)
Benny Andersson, Anni-Frid Lyngstad (Frida),
Agnetha Fältskog, and Björn Ulvaeus
Background information
Also known as Björn & Benny, Agnetha & Anni-Frid
Origin Stockholm, Sweden
Genres
Pop pop rock glam rock Europop disco
Years active 1972–1983
Labels Polar, Metal, Polydor, Atlantic, Universal, Epic, Vogue, RCA, PolyGram, Sunshine (Rhodesia/Zimbabwe), Ariston/Dig It (Italy)
Associated acts Hep Stars, Hootenanny Singers, Benny Anderssons Orkester
Website abbasite.com
Past members
Agnetha Fältskog
Björn Ulvaeus
Benny Andersson
Anni-Frid Lyngstad
Logo ABBA.svg
ABBA (stylised ᗅᗺᗷᗅ) were a Swedish pop group who formed in Stockholm in 1972. With members Agnetha Fältskog, Björn Ulvaeus, Benny Andersson, and Anni-Frid Lyngstad, ABBA became one of the most commercially successful acts in the history of popular music, topping the charts worldwide from 1975 to 1982. They won the Eurovision Song Contest 1974 at the Dome in Brighton, UK, giving Sweden its first triumph in the contest, and were the most successful group ever to take part in the competition.

ABBA’s record sales figure is uncertain and various estimates range from over 140 to over 500 million sold records. This makes them one of the best-selling music artists, and the second best-selling music group of all time, after the Beatles. ABBA was the first group to come from a non-English-speaking country to enjoy consistent success in the charts of English-speaking countries, including the UK, Ireland, the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. The group also enjoyed significant success in Latin American markets, and recorded a collection of their hit songs in Spanish.

During the band’s active years, Fältskog & Ulvaeus and Lyngstad & Andersson were married. At the height of their popularity, both relationships were suffering strain which ultimately resulted in the collapse of the Ulvaeus–Fältskog marriage in 1979 and the Andersson–Lyngstad marriage in 1981. These relationship changes were reflected in the group’s music, with later compositions including more introspective, brooding, dark lyrics.

After ABBA disbanded in December 1982, Andersson and Ulvaeus achieved success writing music for the stage, while Lyngstad and Fältskog pursued solo careers with mixed success. ABBA’s music declined in popularity until several films, notably Muriel’s Wedding (1994) and The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (1994), revived public interest in the group and the spawning of several tribute bands. In 1999, ABBA’s music was adapted into the successful musical Mamma Mia! that toured worldwide. A film of the same name, released in 2008, became the highest-grossing film in the United Kingdom that year.

ABBA were honoured at the 50th anniversary celebration of the Eurovision Song Contest in 2005, when their hit “Waterloo” was chosen as the best song in the competition’s history. The group was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on 15 March 2010.

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Rose Royce

Los Angeles, California, United States
Genres Soul, R&B, disco, funk
Years active 1973–present
Labels Whitfield, Epic, Streetwave, Omni
Associated acts Yvonne Fair
The Undisputed Truth
Website rose-royce.com
Members Gwen Dickey (aka Rose Norwalt)
Kenny Copeland
Kenji Brown
Lequeint “Duke” Jobe
Victor Nix
Henry Garner
Freddie Dunn
Michael Moore
Terry Santiel
Michael Nash
Rose Royce is an American soul and R&B group. They are best known for several hit singles during the 1970s including “Car Wash,” “I Wanna Get Next to You,” “I’m Going Down”, “Wishing on a Star”, and “Love Don’t Live Here Anymore”.

Eagles

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Los Angeles, California, United States
Genres
Rock country rock
Years active 1971–80, 1994–present
Labels
Asylum Geffen Polydor Lost Highway Capitol
Associated acts
Linda Ronstadt J. D. Souther
Website Eagles.com
Members
Don Henley
Joe Walsh
Timothy B. Schmit
Past members
Glenn Frey
Bernie Leadon
Randy Meisner
Don Felder
The Eagles are an American rock band formed in Los Angeles in 1971 by Glenn Frey, Don Henley, Bernie Leadon, and Randy Meisner. With five number-one singles, six Grammy Awards, five American Music Awards, and six number one albums, the Eagles were one of the most successful musical acts of the 1970s. At the end of the 20th century, two of their albums, Their Greatest Hits (1971–1975) and Hotel California, were ranked among the 20 best-selling albums in the United States according to the Recording Industry Association of America. Hotel California is ranked 37th in Rolling Stone’s list of “The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time” and the band was ranked number 75 on the magazine’s 2004 list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.

The Eagles are one of the world’s best-selling bands of all time, having sold more than 150 million records—100 million in the U.S. alone—including 42 million copies of Their Greatest Hits (1971–1975) and 32 million copies of Hotel California. “Their Greatest Hits (1971–1975)” was the best selling album of the 20th century in the U.S. They are the fifth-highest-selling music act and the highest-selling American band in U.S. history.

The Eagles released their self-titled debut album in 1972, which spawned three top 40 singles: “Take It Easy”, “Witchy Woman”, and “Peaceful Easy Feeling”. Their next album, Desperado (1973), was less successful than the first, only reaching number 41 on the charts; neither of its singles reached the top 40. However, the album contained two of the band’s most popular tracks: “Desperado” and “Tequila Sunrise”. They released On the Border in 1974, adding guitarist Don Felder as its fifth member midway through the recording of the album. The album generated two top 40 singles: “Already Gone” and their first number one, “Best of My Love”.

Their 1975 album One of These Nights included three top 10 singles: “One of These Nights”, “Lyin’ Eyes”, and “Take It to the Limit”, the first hitting the top of the charts. The Eagles continued that success and hit their commercial peak in late 1976 with the release of Hotel California, which would go on to sell more than 16 million copies in the U.S. alone and more than 32 million copies worldwide. The album yielded two number-one singles, “New Kid in Town” and “Hotel California”. They released their last studio album for nearly 28 years in 1979 with The Long Run, which spawned three top 10 singles: “Heartache Tonight”, “The Long Run”, and “I Can’t Tell You Why”, the lead single being another chart-topping hit.

The Eagles disbanded in July 1980 but reunited in 1994 for the album Hell Freezes Over, a mix of live and new studio tracks. They have toured consistently since then and were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998. In 2007, the Eagles released Long Road Out of Eden, their first full studio album in 28 years and their sixth number one album. The next year they launched the Long Road Out of Eden Tour in support of the album. In 2013, they began the extended History of the Eagles Tour in conjunction with the band’s documentary release, History of the Eagles.

The Allman Brothers

Background information
Origin Jacksonville, Florida, and Macon, Georgia , United States
Genres Southern rock, jam band, blues rock, country rock
Years active 1969–1976, 1978–1982, 1989–2014
Labels Capricorn, PolyGram, Arista, Epic, Sanctuary
Associated acts Gov’t Mule, The Dead, The Derek Trucks Band, Derek and the Dominos, Hour Glass, Great Southern, Marshall Tucker Band, Sea Level
Website www.allmanbrothersband.com
Past members Duane Allman
Gregg Allman
Dickey Betts
Jai Johanny “Jaimoe” Johanson
Berry Oakley
Butch Trucks
Chuck Leavell
Lamar Williams
David Goldflies
Dan Toler
Mike Lawler
David “Frankie” Toler
Warren Haynes
Johnny Neel
Allen Woody
Marc Quiñones
Oteil Burbridge
Jack Pearson
Derek Trucks
The Allman Brothers Band was an American rock band formed in Jacksonville, Florida in 1969 by brothers Duane Allman (slide guitar and lead guitar) and Gregg Allman (vocals, keyboards, songwriting), as well as Dickey Betts (lead guitar, vocals, songwriting), Berry Oakley (bass guitar), Butch Trucks (drums), and Jai Johanny “Jaimoe” Johanson (drums). While the band has been called the principal architects of southern rock, they also incorporate elements of blues, jazz, and country music, and their live shows have jam band-style improvisation and instrumentals.

The group’s first two studio releases stalled commercially, but their 1971 live release, At Fillmore East, represented an artistic and commercial breakthrough. The album features extended renderings of their songs “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed” and “Whipping Post”, and is often considered among the best live albums ever made. Group leader Duane Allman was killed in a motorcycle accident later that year, and the band dedicated Eat a Peach (1972) in his memory, a dual studio/live album that cemented the band’s popularity. Following the motorcycle death of bassist Berry Oakley later that year, the group recruited keyboardist Chuck Leavell and bassist Lamar Williams for 1973’s Brothers and Sisters, which, combined with the hit single, “Ramblin’ Man”, placed the group at the forefront of 1970s rock music. Internal turmoil overtook the band soon after; the group dissolved in 1976, re-formed briefly at the end of the decade with additional personnel changes, and dissolved again in 1982.

The band re-formed once more in 1989, releasing a string of new albums and touring heavily. A series of personnel changes in the late 1990s was capped by the departure of Betts. The group found stability during the 2000s with bassist Oteil Burbridge and guitarists Warren Haynes and Derek Trucks (the nephew of their drummer), and became renowned for their month-long string of shows at New York City’s Beacon Theater each spring. The band retired in 2014 with the departure of the aforementioned members. The band has been awarded eleven gold and five platinum albums,[2] and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995. Rolling Stone ranked them 52nd on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time in 2004.[3]

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